Turn Back The Time: This Day In History.

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Turn Back The Time: This Day In History.

Post by emcf30 on Fri Aug 17, 2012 9:44 am

Figure I would start a blog that would detail historic weather events of the past.

Today, we will start out with:

HURRICANE CAMILLE LANDFALL

Hurricane Camille was the strongest tropical cyclone of the 1969 Atlantic hurricane season. The second of three catastrophic Category 5 hurricanes to make landfall in the United States during the 20th century (the others being 1935's Labor Day hurricane and 1992's Hurricane Andrew), which it did near the mouth of the Mississippi River on the night of August 17.

Camille and unofficially the Labor Day Hurricane were the only Atlantic hurricanes to exhibit recorded sustained wind speeds of at least 190 miles per hour until Allen joined the club in 1980, and remains the only confirmed Atlantic hurricane in recorded history to make landfall with wind speeds at or above such a level. The actual windspeed of Hurricane Camille will never be known, however, as it destroyed all of the wind recording instruments upon making landfall. By central pressure, in turn, Camille was the second strongest U.S. landfalling hurricane in recorded history, second only to the Labor Day Hurricane in 1935. It was also the first modern Category 5 hurricane to ever receive a person's name when making landfall in the United States.



The origins of Hurricane Camille were from a tropical wave off the western coast of Africa on August 5. It tracked nearly due westward, eventually becoming clearly identifiable on satellite imagery on August 9. By that time, the thunderstorm activity concentrated into a circular area of convection. The next day, it moved through the Lesser Antilles, although there was no evidence of a closed circulation. On August 13, the wave passed near or over the southern coast of Jamaica as its convection spread northeastward through the Bahamas. Subsequently it began a slower motion to the northwest. On August 14, the Hurricane Hunters flew to investigate for a closed circulation near the Bahamas as well as near the Cayman Islands. The crew observed a developing center in the western Caribbean, and winds quickly reached tropical storm status. It is estimated Tropical Storm Camille developed late on August 14 with winds of 60 mph, about 50 miles west-northwest of Grand Cayman.

Throughout its duration, it was a small tropical cyclone, although with a radius of gale force winds spreading 100 miles to the north, the storm's thunderstorm area quickly spread over Cuba. As the storm approached the western coast of Cuba, it began rapid deepening, reaching hurricane status and less than 12 hours later attaining major hurricane status, or winds of 115 mph. Prior to landfall, its eye was tracked by radar from Havana; it is estimated the hurricane moved ashore between Cape San Antonio and Guane late on August 15 as a major hurricane. Camille was a small hurricane as it crossed western Cuba, and its winds decreased to 105 mph before it emerged into the Gulf of Mexico

As it continued toward the Gulf Coast of the United States, Camille maintained its small eye, and forecasters continued to anticipate a turn toward Florida. Late on August 17, a reconnaissance flight was forced to end its mission early due to a damaged engine. Before it left the storm, the crew recorded a pressure of 909 hectopascals (26.8 inHg) and estimated surface winds at 190 mph, while Camille was located about 100 miles southeast of the Mississippi River Delta. There were no subsequent Hurricane Hunter flights, but it is estimated the hurricane maintained much of its intensity. After passing very near southeastern Louisiana, Hurricane Camille made landfall late on August 17 in and desimated Pass Christian, Mississippi, ground zero. Maximum wind speeds near the coastline are unknown, but gusts were estimated to have approached 200 mph.



Who could forget about the famous Hurricane Party that was held on the third floor of the Richelieu Manor Apartments in Pass Christian, Mississippi, in the path of the eyewall as it made landfall. The high storm surge flooded and destroyed the building, and there was only one survivor to tell of the story of the others.

Richelieu Manor Apartments, Before.



After:




Storm Surge in the area.







BULLETIN 9 PM CDT SUNDAY AUGUST 17, 1969

...CAMILLE...EXTREMELY DANGEROUS...CENTER HAS PASSED MOUTH OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER...CONTINUES TOWARD THE MISSISSIPPI ALABAMA COAST...

HURRICANE WARNINGS ARE IN EFFECT FROM NEW ORLEANS AND GRAND ISLE LOUISIANA EATSWARD ACROSS THE MISSISSIPPI...ALABAMA...AND NORTHWEST FLORIDA COAST TO APPALACHICOLA. GALE WARNINGS ARE IN EFFECT FROM MORGAN CITY TO GRAND ISLE. CONTINUE ALL PRECAUTIONS.

WINDS ARE INCREASING AND TIDES ARE RISING ALONG THE NORTHERN GULF COAST FROM GRAND ISLE EASTWARD. HURRICANE FORCE WINDS ARE NOW OCCURRING OVER EXTREME SOUTHEAST LOUISIANA AND WILL BE SPREADING OVER MOST OF THE WARNING AREA WITHIN THE NEXT FEW HOURS.

THE FOLLOWING TIDES ARE EXPECTED TONIGHT AS CAMILLE MOVES INLAND...MISSISSIPPI COAST GULFPORT TO PASCAGOULA 15 TO 20 FEET...PASCAGOULA TO MOBILE 10 TO 15 FEET...EAST OF MOBILE TO PENSACOLA 6 TO 10 FEET. ELSEWHERE IN THE AREA OF HURRICANE WARNING EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER 5 TO 8 FEET. IMMEDIATE EVACUATION OF AREAS THAT WILL BE AFFECTED BY THESE HIGH TIDES IS URGENTLY ADVISED.

THE CENTER OF CAMILLE IS EXPECTED TO MOVE INLAND ON THE MISSISSIPPI COAST NEAR GULFPORT BEFORE MIDNIGHT.

SEVERAL TORNADOES ARE LIKELY TONIGHT WITHIN 100 MILES OF THE COAST FROM EXTREME SOUTHEASTERN LOUISIANA TO FORT WALTON BEACH FLORIDA.

HEAVY RAINS WITH LOCAL AMOUNTS 8 TO 10 INCHES WILL SPREAD INTO SOUTHEAST MISSISSIPPI...SOUTHWEST ALABAMA...AND THE FLORIDA PANHANDLE TONIGHT. AND FLOOD STATEMENTS NEEDED WILL BE ISSUED BY THE LOCAL WEATHER BUREAU OFFICES.

AT 9 PM CDT...THE CENTER OF HURRICANE CAMILLE WAS LOCATED BY NEW ORLEANS AND OTHER LAND BASED RADARS NEAR LATITUDE 29.9 NORTH...LONGITUDE 89.1 WEST...OR ABOUT 35 MILES SOUTH OF GULFPROT MISSISSIPPI AND 60 MILES EAST OF NEW ORLEANS. CAMILLE WILL CONTINUE NORTHWARD ABOUT 15 MPH.

HIGHEST WINDS ARE ESTIMATED 190 MPH NEAR THE CENTER. HURRICANE FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD 60 MILES AND GALES EXTEND OUTWARD 180 MILES FROM THE CENTER. THE AIR FORCE RECON FLIGHT INTO CAMILLE THIS AFTERNOON REPORTED A CENTRAL PRESSURE OF 26.61 INCHES.

THOSE IN THE AREA OF THE EYE ARE REMINDED THAT THE WINDS WILL DIE DOWN SUDDENLY IF THE EYE PASSES OVER YOUR AREA BUT THE WINDS WILL INCREASE AGAIN RAPIDLY AND FROM THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION AS THE EYE MOVES AWAY. THE LULL WITH CAMILLE WILL PROBABLY LAST FROM A FEW MINUTES TO ONE HALF HOUR AND PERSONS SHOULD NOT VENTURE FAR FROM SAFE SHELTER.

WINDS GUSTED TO SLIGHTLY OVER 100 MPH AT BOOTHVILLE LOUISIANA ABOUT 7 PM. NEW ORLEANS WEATHER BUREAU OFFICE WAS REPORTING WINDS 45 TO 50 MPH WITH GUSTS TO NEAR 70 MPH AT 8 PM.

REPEATING THE 9PM POSITION...29.9 NORTH...89.1 WEST.

THE NEXT ADVISORY WILL BER ISSUED BY THE NEW ORLEANS WEATHER BUREAU AT 11 PM AND BULLETIN AT 1 AND 3 AM CDT.

SLOAN

Could you even imagine a storm of that magnitude hitting along the US Coast today.
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Re: Turn Back The Time: This Day In History.

Post by emcf30 on Fri Aug 17, 2012 10:08 am


This Day In Weather History

Haiti (1929)
Haiti was levelled by hurricane along along with an earthquake and tidal waves.

The East (1979)
An unusual polar air mass gripped the area resulting in 36 record lows being set from New England to the Deep South. Frost occurred in the West Virginia mountains.
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Hurricane Bob

Post by emcf30 on Sun Aug 19, 2012 8:16 am

On this date in history in 1991, Hurricane Bob roared ashore near Newport, R.I. Winds gusted to over 120 mph in places along the Rhode Island and Massachusetts coasts. Sixteen people were killed. Rainfall was also intense. A total of 7.76 inches of rain fell in Portland, Maine, and 7.99 inches of rain fell at Gorham, Maine. Bob caused $2 billion dollars in damage.







Hurricane Bob was one of the costliest hurricanes in New England history. The second named storm and first hurricane of the 1991 Atlantic hurricane season, Bob developed from an area of low pressure near The Bahamas on August 16. The depression steadily intensified, and became Tropical Storm Bob late on August 16. Bob curved north-northwestward as a tropical storm, but re-curved to the north-northeast after becoming a hurricane on August 17. As such, it brushed the Outer Banks of North Carolina on August 18 and August 19, and subsequently intensified into a major hurricane (Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale). After peaking in intensity with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph, Bob weakened slightly as it approached the coast of New England.

Bob made landfall twice in Rhode Island as a Category 2 hurricane on August 19, first on Block Island and then in Newport. Upon doing so, it became the only hurricane to make landfall in the contiguous United States during the 1991 season. Moving further inland, Bob rapidly weakened, and deteriorated to a tropical storm while emerging into the Gulf of Maine. Shortly thereafter, Bob made landfall in Maine as a strong tropical storm early on August 20. Bob entered the Canadian province of New Brunswick a few hours later, where it transitioned into an extratropical cyclone. By August 21, the remnants of Bob crossed Newfoundland and re-emerged into the open Atlantic Ocean. The remnants traveled a long distance across the northern Atlantic Ocean, and finally dissipated west of Portugal on August 29.

Bob left extensive damage throughout New England in its wake, totaling approximately $1.5 billion (1991 USD, $2.56 billion 2012 USD). This made it the second costliest United States hurricane at the time; as of 2010, it ranked twenty-second in the category. In addition, seventeen fatalities were reported in association with Bob. The loss of life and most of the damage occurred as a result of high winds and rough seas. There were six confirmed tornadoes during its passage.
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Re: Turn Back The Time: This Day In History.

Post by scouter534 on Sun Aug 19, 2012 11:59 am

Great blog E. Thanks for posting it. It is amazing the destruction these things cause and how each one is so different.
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Re: Turn Back The Time: This Day In History.

Post by sangria on Sun Aug 19, 2012 12:16 pm

How the heck did I miss this blog post??? Thanks a bunch e.....
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Re: Turn Back The Time: This Day In History.

Post by Tropic Bunker on Mon Aug 20, 2012 8:35 am

Great blog e!..........AS LONG AS YOU SKIP AUGUST 24 1992!!!!!!!
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Re: Turn Back The Time: This Day In History.

Post by emcf30 on Mon Aug 20, 2012 8:42 am

Tropic Bunker wrote:Great blog e!..........AS LONG AS YOU SKIP AUGUST 24 1992!!!!!!!

No a chance on that one......Sorry
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Re: Turn Back The Time: This Day In History.

Post by gomexwx on Mon Aug 20, 2012 9:18 am

Nice blog E man...Camille was the storm that stuck my interst in weather. I remember the night she roared ashoar well..We got a tree dumped on our house..LOL

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Hurricane Andrew

Post by emcf30 on Fri Aug 24, 2012 12:02 am

HURRICANE ANDREW



What your doing twenty years ago. For those of you who lived down in the Metro Dade at the time, I am certain you heard this message time after time.